Date:

Mon, 9 Dec 2002 04:11:53 -0800 (PST)

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Subject:

[Cryan et al.] Roscommon Herald Articles No. 117

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CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com

Roscommon Herald Articles No. 117

Thanks to Veronica Cryan for the typing

 

 

25th June 1904.

 

THREATENING LANGUAGE.

 

Thomas Cryan, Clogher, steward on Coolavin

estate,

summond Thomas Cryan (John) of same name, for

threatening language and to recover the amount of

13s.6d. lent cash and sought to have defendant

bound

to the peace .There was a cross case for

threatening

to shoot, and for the wages due to defendant .

Mr. MacDermot appeared for the complainant.

Complainant, in reply to Mr. MacDermot complained

to

the steward on the Coolavin Estate.

He came in contact with the man in the course of

his

duties, gives him work and let him []. There was

a

dispute some time ago about measurement and ill

feeling exists since. On 6th.May complainant was

on

his usual rounds, when he met the defendant. They

had

some hot words, and defendant drew a bottle of

whiskey

from his pocket and swore by --- [sic] he'd dash

out

his brains on the road.

Mr. Kilbride ------That frightened you entirely

(laughter)? -----yes. Defendant took a handful

of

silver from his pocket and dared me to take my

half

crown. He came to my house on five occasions when

he

was drunk. He is a persecution to my wife and

children.

Defendant-----Didn't I demand wages from you that

evening? --- No.

Mr. Kilbride (to complainant) do you owe him

anything?

----No.

Mrs. Honoria Cryan , wife of complainant

corroborated.

The cross-case was then taken up.

Cryan (the defendant) deposed that this man

threatened

to shoot him, and defendant said, "Oh, begorra,

maybe

you wouldn't (laughter). I asked him to give me

the

money due to me.

Mr. Kilbride --- is it not true that he paid you

the

sum of 13s. 6d. for 3 days ? ----No.

Complainant produced a book showing that the

amount

was paid.

Defendant-----That I may die before I go home if

you

did (laughter)

Mr. Kilbride ---- Did you borrow 2s.6d. from

this

man? ---No.

Complainant-----Why did you take out a handful of

silver and dare me to take my half-crown? ----I

did

not.

Complainant -----I declare you did.

Defendant ---I declare you didn't (loud

laughter).

Mr. McDermott --- Were you ever summoned for

beating

your father? ----I might be (laughter).

Will you deny beating him? --- I wont deny it

(laughter) but I'm not going to tell on myself

(loud

laughter).

Mr. Kilbride said he believed the sum of 13s. 6d.

was

paid to the defendant, as Mr. Cryan's book seems

to be

well kept, and the case of Thos. Cryan (John)

against

Thos Cryan for the wages would be dismissed also

the

case of threatening to shoot. He would be bound

to

keep the peace for twelve months himself in 10

and

two sureties of 5 each. The Bench also gave a

decree

for 2s 6d. and 3s costs.

 

 

 

Date:

Mon, 9 Dec 2002 04:17:27 -0800 (PST)

From:

"Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | This is Spam | Add to Address Book

Subject:

[Cryan et al.] Roscommon Herald Articles No. 118

To:

CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com

 

 

 

 

 

CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com

Roscommon Herald Articles No. 118

Thanks to Veronica Cryan for the typing

 

8th October 1904.

 

THE SALARIES:

 

The clerk read the following:-

 

Local Government Board.

"Dublin, 30th September,1904.

 

"Sir---I am directed by the local Government for

Ireland to state that they have had before them

minutes of proceedings of the Board of Guardians

of

Boyle Union on the 10th inst. when the Guardians

had

under consideration the report of the committee

appointed to deal with the circular letter of the

local government Board of the 8th ult. relative

to

increases in the salaries of Union officers and

in

reference and thereto I am to state the Board

considered it advisable to leave to each Board of

Guardians the matter of fixing a scale of

salaries for

their own officers and that the scale was

suggested as

a means of insuring that increases of salaries

should

be granted in a regular way, and without being

influenced by personal considerations, except of

course the question as to whether the others

discharged their duties satisfactorily. It was

not

contemplated that a scale should be formulated

binding

on a number of Unions schemes which would

present

considerable difficulties. The Board would,

however be

very pleased to supply any information in their

power

which the Guardians consider would be serviceable

in

framing the proposed scale for the requirements

of the

Boyle Union, the guardians might, therefore,

taking

into consideration the salaries paid to the

several

officers in the Union proceed to frame a scale

which

would fulfill the requirements mentioned above.

The

Board would prefere to wait the completion of

such a

scale before sanctioning any increases of

salaries to

Union Officers but they would be prepared then to

allow the increase which the Guadians now

propose to

grant to certain officers to antedate

from the time they were voted by the guardians.

I am sir, your obededient servant.

A.R. BARLAS, Asistant sec.,

 

The Clerk, Boyle Union.

 

Clerk-----Well gentlemen, what will you do with

this

letter?

Mr.Travers-----We are a very small board to go

into

that matter today, and I suggest it be adjourned

for

a month or summon a board in the meantime. That

would

be the best way to do business.

Chairman-----You are perfectly right, this is a

very

small board to deal with a matter of that kind.

The

increases are neither granted nor rejected yet.

Mr. Travers--- is it left in the hands of the

guardians.

Mr. Cryan-----I do not see why you should adjourn

it.

It is only ordinary business. and we meet to

transact

it every Saturday.

Mr. Travers said it was too grave a matter to

deal

with that today.

Chairman-----What do you say Mr. Odbert?

Clerk----It is for the board, and not for me.

Mr. Travers----Adjourn it.

Chairman---- It is a question for a full board to

consider.

Mr. Keenan-----There should be a summoned board

to

consider it.

Mr. Cryan----What do you want with a summoned

board?

Mr. Travers----To consider that matter. What we

have

done is not sanctioned by the local Government

Board.

It is still in the hands of the Board.

Mr. Cryan said he was in favour of dealing with

every

question as it came before the meeting.

Clerk----- you will have to summon a Board to do

the

salaries.

Mr. Cryan----Probably. I will be in Sligo next on

next

Saturday at the meeting of the Proposal

Committee.

Chairman-----How long will I adjourn it for ?

Mr. Cryan ----The country people say we are

always

doing things by halves.

Mr. Travers----When every guardian gets notice on

this

subject, they will attend .

Chairman----If you deal with it now, other

guardians

will say "What right had your small Board to go

into

such an important matter as that?

Mr. Travers----There will a meeting of the Rural

District Council on next Saturday and it would be

a

sauitable day.

Chairman---Send out notices for this day week.

Mr. Mullany----Give a fortnight's notice. It

would not

be sufficient to give only weeks notice.

According to

the Local Government Act, you must give fourteen

days

notice.

Clerk---- It is not my doing.

Mr. Mullany----It will still be an illegal

procedure

if you do not give the legal time and notice.

Clerk-----Any letter from the local Government

Board

can be considered on the day it comes in.

Mr. Mullany---This is a very important matter,

and it

is better to give plenty of time to it.

Chairman-----How long do you suggest Mr. Mullany?

Mr. Mullany----Say a month.

Mr. Travers----Hit on the proper time.

Mr. Mullany----Give every man time to make up his

mind

what he will do.We will leave it deal with the

circular relative to the increasing of Union

Officers

salaries.

Mr. Travers----- They will either be increased or

decreased when the scale is fixed.

Chairman------This day week will be meeting day

for

No:1 Council.

Mr. Mullany----That wont do, there is always too

much

business to be done at District Council Meetings.

It

is very important and it is better give it time.

If

you give a month's notice you will have no cranks

like

myself complaining (laughter).

Master---- As far as I am concerned I do not want

to

go any further with it.

Boyle Union have the lowest average cost in

Ireland,

being only 6s.... per head.

He had nothing to say to the Guardians, but the

Local

Government Board treated him badly.

Mr. Mullany----The mistake was to put in many

officers

together.

Every member of the Board knows they are most

deserving officers, but each officer should be

taken

separately.

Mr.Travers----- It should be considered in

another

way.

Mr. Mullany------A Journey for a month, the Board

to

be summoned to consider it and that would settle

it.

Mr. Cryan----They are very deserving officers,

but a

general increase did not look well.

Chairman----It is the local Government Board

Office

they must blame.

It was unanimously agreed to summon a Board to

consider the circular of that day month.

Mr. Pete Lenaghan stated that in consequence of

the

letter from the local Government Board he would

withdraw his notice of motion relative to the

increasing of the officers salary.

 

 

 

 

Date:

Tue, 10 Dec 2002 03:44:33 -0800 (PST)

From:

"Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | This is Spam | Add to Address Book

Subject:

[Cryan et al.] Roscommon Herald Articles No. 119

To:

CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com

 

 

 

 

 

CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com

Roscommon Herald Articles No. 119

Thanks to Veronica Cryan for the typing

 

 

 

18th February,1882.

BOYLE BOARD OF GUARDIANS.

 

THE SEED RATE.

[]

Clerk - This letter is in the handwriting of a

lady,

and I have a letter from John Mulloy stating

he is

not security at all and, and threatening

proceedings

against me. I dont say it is the Ballyfermoyle

man,

but a John Mulloy is security, whoever he is.

The Clerk then read a copy of the reply which the

Local Government Board sent to Messrs Mulloy and

Walsh, stating that it is the duty of the rate

collectors to use every means in their power to

collect the Seed Rate as made and assessssed by

the

Board of Guardians, and that the Local Government

Board cannot interfere.

Clerk - I suppose the board will mark their

letter

"read".

Mr. Mulhall - It is a very serious charge they

make.

Clerk - There is no foundation for it. I am happy

to

say that we have not an individual who has

denied, to

my own knowledge getting the seed rate assessed

with.

Mr. Mulhall - The gentlemen who wrote that letter

made

a very serious charge.

Chairman - I dont take it to myself for one .

The Clerk read the letter he received from Mr.

John

Mulloy, of Ballyfermoyle, denying that he was the

surety. The signatures to the two letters were

not the

same. He was looking over the bond, and he found

the

resideuce was given as Cornacartha.

Mr. Burns - I am guardian for that division, and

there

is no such man living in that townland.

After a pause, the Clerk said Cryanstown was the

place

this John Mulloy lived in.

Mr. Patterson said there was such a man as John

Mulloy

of Cryanstown.

The letters were marked "read".

 

 

 

Date:

Tue, 10 Dec 2002 03:47:40 -0800 (PST)

From:

"Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | This is Spam | Add to Address Book

Subject:

[Cryan et al.] Roscommon Herald Articles No. 120

To:

CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com

 

 

 

 

 

CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com

Roscommon Herald Articles No. 120

Thanks to Veronica Cryan for the typing

 

 

4th November,1882.

 

 

THE HOMICIDE OF THOMAS HUNT.

 

On last Wednesday an investigation was held in

the

Boyle Courthouse, at the termination of the Petty

Sessions business, into the homicide of the small

farmer, Thomas Hunt, at Mockmoyne on the 2nd of

October last. Mr. Hackett, who was chairman at

the

Petty Sessions, occupied the chair in the

magistrate's

room, and the representative of the journal

having

applied that the Press should be addmitted, Mr.

Hackett said he saw no objection to the

proceedings

being published. Major Robertson and Mr.Mayne,

R.M.,

who were the other magistrates present, then

left

the room and consulted together for some time in

an

adjoining apartment. After a short interval the

Head

Constable asked Mr. Hackett, the Petty Sessions

Clerk,

and solicitors engaged in the cases, to walk into

the

second room. Major Robertson moved Mr. Mayne to

the

chair, and an application being made to havee the

Press admitted Major Robertson refused it.

Mr.Hackett

then left the place and declined to identify

himself

any further with the proceedings. Mr. Randal

Peyton,

Crown Prosecutor , conducted the case for the

authorities, and Mr. Farrell McDonnell,

solicitor,

Roscommon, and another legal gentleman, defended

the

accused parties. Informations in the case have

been

lodged against Thomas Kennedy, John Kennedy,

James

Cryan, Thomas Cryan and John Cryan of

Ballinultha.

Thomas Kennedy and James Cryan were brought up in

custody from Roscommon Jail where they had been

detained on remand and the others surrendered to

bail.

The inquiry lasted over three hours and it is

understood that important evidence was tendered

by the

Cryans. The magistrates decided to admit all the

accused to bail except Thomas Kennedy, who was

remanded to Roscommon Jail, and the investigation

was

adjourned until Tuesday.

 

 

 

 

 

Date:

Tue, 10 Dec 2002 03:59:19 -0800 (PST)

From:

"Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | This is Spam | Add to Address Book

Subject:

[Cryan et al.] Roscommon Herald Articles No. 121

To:

CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com

 

 

 

 

 

CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com

Roscommon Herald Articles No. 121

Thanks to Veronica Cryan for the typing

 

23rd December,1882.

 

CONNAUGHT WINTER ASSIZES.

 

Sligo, Monday.

 

CHARGE OF MURDER.

 

 

Thomas Kennedy was indicted for the murder of

Thomas

Hunt, on the 2nd October last. He pleaded "Not

guilty,"

and was defended by Mr. Kelly, instructed by Mr.

Walsh of Sligo.

Sergeant Robinson and The MacDermott, Q.C.

(instructed

by Mr. Randal Peyton), procecuted on behalf of

the

Crown.

A special jury tried the case.

Andrew McElroy examined by Sergeant Robinson,

said - I

live within three miles of Boyle county

Roscommon. On

the 2nd October last I was in Boyle, and I left

the

town a little after nine o'clock at night.

I was accompanied homeward by Nicholas Carty and

Michael O'Gara. As we went towards Mockmoyne I

heard

a noise on the road, and when we came near to the

residence of Mr.Hopkins we saw a crowd before us.

 

We then met three men - Thomas Kennedy (the

prisoner's

brother), and a man named Brennan - and shortly

after

we passed them we came to a place where there was

a

man lying on the road. That was about fifteen

yards

further on beyond the place where we met Brennan

and

the Kennedys. When we came up to the man we

struck

matches and we saw that he was Thomas Hunt. In my

opinion he was dead then. Before we came up to

him I

heard a sound like that which would be caused by

blows

of a stick. I heard the sound twice, The only

other

people I saw on the road then, in addition to the

three men we met were men before going home from

the

fair. The three men were stooped when I saw them

first, and appeared to be looking for something

the

roadside. Carty asked the Kennedys and Brennan

if

they knew the man who was lying on the road, and

the

prisoner's brother said "no".

Cross examined by Mr. Kelly - That answer was

given

before the matches were lighted. A great number

of

people were charged with this offence. A man

named

McElroy, a cousin of my own, was charged with it.

Nicholas Carty, examined by The MacDermott, Q.C.,

said

- I was with the last witness leaving the fair of

Boyle on the night of the 2nd October last. When

we

came near to the place where Hunt was lying on

the

road we met the Kennedys and Brennan, and some

one of

the three said he did not know the man who was

lying.

McElroy said "it was not the place to leave a man

lying on the road," O'Gara lighted a match, and

it was

then seen that there was blood on Hunt's left

nostril,

and he appeared to be dead.

Cross-examined by Mr. Kelly - I think there was a

fourth man along with the Kennedys and Brennan.

John Cryan , exanined by Sergeant Robinson, said

- I

left the October fair of Boyle with James Cryan,

Thomas and Winifred Cryan. After we had gone a

short

distance out of the town we saw some men on the

road

before us. When we came near to them a man named

Toolan said he was about to be beaten on his

brother-in-law's account.

Toolan and a man named McGowan then had a

squabble and

the deceased came up just then. When he came up

Thomas

Kennedy struck him on the back of the head and

knocked

him down. Kennedy then said - "I gave him that,

and

long I watched for him ". I did not see any

blow

struck but one, and after receiving that blow

Hunt

spoke a word. Winifred Cryan said to the prisoner

"O

Thomas, what is that you have done."

Cross-examined by Mr. Kelly - I was myself

charged

with this offence, and my brother was arrested

and in

gaol at the time I gave this information.

Thomas Cryan said - Thomas Kennedy raised his

hand,

and gave Hunt a slight tip first, and Hunt turned

round and said, "I am struck. Kennedy struck him

again on the back of the head, and he fell; and

Kennedy then turned round, and either said, "I

had it

in for him," or "I watched him."

Cross-examined by Mr. Kelly - I was arrested, but

admitted to bail for this offence.

To the MacDermott, Q.C. - The Kennedys said they

would

shoot me, or I would be shot, if I did not keep

quiet.

Winifred Cryan said - I am the prisoner's first

cousin. On the night of the 2nd October, when I

was

going home with my husband and others from the

fair of

Boyle, I saw a crowd of people on the road at

Mockmoyne. Two men, named Toolan and McGowan, had

been

fighting , and when the row was going on, Thomas

Kennedy aimed a blow at Hunt, the deceased, and

when

Hunt was "settling" himself on his feet again,

Kennedy

gave him a second blow, and knocked him down.

Kennedy then leaped back on the road and said, "I

gave

him that." John Kennedy asked the prisoner, when

he

leaped back on the road, if anyone had attempted

to

strike him. Nobody went to his assistance.

Cross examined by Mr. Kelly - I saw the deceased

taking hold of James Cryan's throat in Back-lane,

in

the town of Boyle about four o'clock in the

afternoon

of the fair day. James Cryan did not say then

that he

would have satisfaction.

James Cryan stated that when he met Thomas Hunt

in

Boyle fair he asked him for money he owed him.

Hunt

said he had none to give him, and witness said he

would process or summon him to petty sessions to

recover the amount. Hunt caught him by the

necktie but

witness did not threaten him then; neither did he

strike him at a later period during the evening

or

night.

Dr.O'Farrell described the wounds inflicted on

the

deceased. There was a punctured wound on the back

of

his head, and opposite that wound there was a

bruise

running from the bridge of his to his right

eyebrow

causing a fissure in the bone, and opposite this

wound

on the temple there was a clot of blood on the

brain.

The wound on the back of the head was the one (in

the

doctor's opinion) that caused death. It was

punctured,

and appeared to have been made with a sharp stone

or

pointed instrument.

This closed the evidence for the Crown, and

Mr.Kelly

addressed the jury on behalf of the prisoner. He

submitted that the fatal quarrel on the road was

the

outcome of the row which was commenced between

Hunt

and James Cryan in the town of Boyle, when Cryan,

as

would be proved threatened, if he did not get

money,

he would have blood before going home. In the

case of

James Cryan, they had it proved that Hunt owed

him

money; that Hunt assaulted him in Boyle; and they

would have testimony

to satisfy them that Cryan threatened to be

avenged.

Thomas Keane, examined for the defence, said - I

was

present in Boyle when James Cryan asked the

deceased,

Thomas Hunt, for some money which he owed him.

Hunt

replied that he had none to give him, and Cryan

said,

"If you don't give me money, I'll have blood

before I

go home."

Cross-examined by Sergeant Robinson - There was a

big

investigation held in the town of Boyle after

this

occurrence, and I made no information. There was

nothing said by Cryan after he asked for the

money

about a summons or process. The conversation took

place not in Back-lane, but in Bridge Street.

Mr. Justice Lawson - in Bridge-street, did you

say? -

Yes.

Was Winifred Cryan there? - No.

Mr. Justice Lawson - Well, I believe you were not

there at all.

Mr. John McKeon said he was with the Kennedys on

this

night. When they came within a short distance of

where

a row was going on, on the road, John Kennedy

left his

brother, (the prisoner) behind him with witness,

and

he went to see if he would know any of the

parties.

When John came back again, witness went home, and

the

Kennedys remained behind.

John Kennedy said - On the night of the 2nd

October I

accompanied my brother home from Boyle fair. The

Cryans passed us on the road, and joined a party

before us. Shortly afterwards I noticed that the

parties before us appeared to be striking each

other.

I heard a voice saying - "Let him out." I told my

brother to stop with McKeon until I would see if

I

knew any of the parties. I went on towards the

crowd;

and a stone was thrown up beside me. I called

"Which

of you is pegging the stones?" and I got no

answer. I

went up to within four yards of the men, and I

saw

Thomas Hunt standing along with the Cryans. I saw

him

get a blow which knocked him into middle of the

road,

and I then turned back to my brother, and told

him

that I had seen a man knocked down. Before

turning

back, however, I had seen Michael McGowan going

across

the road and giving Thomas Hunt (who had been

knocked

down) a kick where he lay.

Sergeant Robinson - There is not one word of this

in

the printed statement of the witness.

Witness - If necessary I can tell who knocked

Thomas

Hunt down.

Mr. Kelly - Well, who did it?

Witness - I was threatened up to this, but I

won't be

threatened any longer. James Cryan is the man who

knocked him down.

Mr. Justice Lawson - You have relieved your

conscience

now.

Witness - Thomas Cryan threatened me.

When I went to his house for boots he said "If

you

hold your tongue, nothing can be done; but, if

you

open your mouth, I'll shoot you."

Cross-examined by Sergeant Robinson - Your

brother was

not afraid to go up to the crowd? He was afraid

myself. I can't answer why one coward went on and

left

two cowards behind.

Did you know it was Hunt who was struck when you

saw

him down? -Yes, I did.

Did you ever swear "I did not know it was Hunt

until

Carty and McElroy came up?" - I don't know that

I

did.

Did you ever swear this, "I can't say Hunt was

struck

more than once; I can't say that it was the Cryan

who

knocked him down ,

I was threatened that I would be shot.

Mr. Justice Lawson said he had read the

information

made by the witness, and in it he had not said a

word

about the presence of McKeon on this night.

The evidence having concluded,

Mr. Kelly again addressed the jury for the

prisoner,

and Sergeant Robinson replied, pointing out the

salient points of the Crown case, and the one

reliable

and inconsistent character of the evidence

tendered on

behalf of the accused.

There were some circumstances in the case which

reduced the case to manslaughter; and if the jury

agreed in that view, the Crown would be

satisfied.

Mr. Justice Lawson in charging the jury, said it

would

be very desirable if an example could be made of

some

of the witnesses, by prosecuting them for

perjury.

The Jury found the prisoner guilty of

manslaughter.

Thomas Kennedy found guilty of manslaughter of

Thomas

Hunt, was sentenced to five years penal

servitude.

Owen Dodd pleaded "Guilty" to an indictment

charging

him with having stolen a quantity of wool, the

property of Mr. James Ward, of Kingsland, Boyle.

He

was sentenced to six months' imprisonment.

 

 

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Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2002 04:17:58 -0800 (PST)

From: "Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | This is Spam | Add to Address Book

Subject: [Cryan et al.]

Pension and Medal Applications

To: CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com

 

Hi

This letter and form statement were written by my

grand uncle Patrick James Cryan as part of his

application for the Service (1917-1921) Medal. I

am posting it to show the kinds of material it is

possible to find from diverse sources. I had

checked the army archives but recently discovered that

the Pensions Administration Section of the

Department of Defence, Aras an tSaile, Renmore, Galway

contained archives of pension and medal applications.

 

Caoimhghin

Thanks to Veronica Cryan for the typing

 

 

 

M.D. 2934.

 

With reference to the requirement to indicate the

Fianna Battalion on Sluagh Officer for 3 months

ending 11/7/21, I beg leave to submit the following;-

On the occasion of the split in the Irish

National Volunteers in 1914, a small number of us sided

with the Irish Volunteers and participated in all

parades and route marches under the then Volunteer

Commandant; Diarmuid O'Connell. Our own O/C. was then, and up

to 1920, Maurice Griffin.

In 1918, Diammuid O'Riordan took over as

Volunteer Commandant, and I was instructed to accompany him

and three other Volunteers in a rural collection of

money for the purchase of arms. Later that year, we as

a unit under our own O/C , took part in field

manoeuvres carried out by the First Battalion. Following on

this operation, the Brigade Commandant as well some

Battalion and Company Officers were arrested and

imprisoned. During their imprisonment, we formed

part of a Volunteer/Fianna/Cumann na mBan operation to

save their crops and harvest.

 

In 1919 we also formed part of a Volunteer/Fianna

exercise in the seizure of the town (Caherciveen)

band instruments which were being retained by the

National Volunteers, and secured them for the use of the

of the Irish Volunteers. We also continued attending

meetings and carried out field exercises under our own

officers - Maurice Griffin, Sean O'Shea, David Cremin,

etc.,

 

In 1920, Maurice Griffin was transferred to the

Volunteers and was replaced as O/C Fianna by Sean

O'Shea. Later that year our collective activities

became more difficult, and from then until the

Truce we acted mostly individually in co-operation with

Brigade, Battalion and Company Volunteer

Officers.

 

For instance, early in 1921, I was informed by

the Battalion Adjutant (John Curran) that he had an

important document of which he required some

urgent typed copies. This document was in fact a copy of

a secret directive from the Inspector-General,

R.I.C. (which has been intercepted by the Dublin

Intelligence unit) ordering the seizure of all Motor Cars,

Motor Bicycles and Bicycles). I produced the required

copies and we despatched them immediately,

resulting there from, all available such vehicles was

seized by the Volunteers on the following night.

 

The R.I.C. reaction to this operation was an

attempted round-up of the Volunteer Officers but all those

wanted evaded and went on the run later to form

the Brigade Flying Column. A month or so later (May,

1921) the Company Adjutant (Patrick Gilsenan) told me

he was to make contact with the Column and wished me to

accompany him. On arrival he went into session

with the Column Officers and on our way back he

informed me of planned action to take effect within a few

days. Three days later, I, with another Fianna member,

John Griffin, were instructed to keep the R.I.C.

Barracks under surveillance. By pre-arranged signal we

indicated to Col. Michael Foley the advance of

three armed policemen. He, in turn passed the

information to Vol. Jesse O'Donoghue, who informed the waiting

ambush party of the position. About eight minutes later

they went into action, but were handicapped by a

little girl having entered the line of fire and being

slightly wounded. The R.I.C. party dashed into a

public house and escaped by the back entrance,

making their way across fields back to the barracks, one

of them having received a leg wound.

 

At no time were we of sufficient members to form

a Battalion.

 

Patrick J. Cryan.

 

 

 

Ref. No: 3507.

APPLICATION FOR MEDAL.

 

Give full particulars and nature of service

rendered up to and including the 11th July, 1921:-

 

I became a member of Fianna Eireann on the

occasion of the "Split" in the Volunteers in, as far as I can

remember, 1913. Mr. Diarmuid O'Connell, whose

present address is the "The Irish House", Caherciveen,

Co. Kerry. was the newly elected Commandant of the

Irish Volunteers and will, I feel sure vouch, for my

activities up to the time of his arrest in 1917.

During that period I took part in every activity

of the local section of Fianna Eireann, which

consisted mostly of route-marching. Mr. Diarmuid O'Riordan

(now of the Kerry Cow Dairy, Cloghran. Co. Dublin,

took over from Mr. O'Connell in 1917 and he is aware

of my activities in the collections for arms,

assistance in the organised saving of crops, etc., of

imprisoned Volunteers, the carrying of despatches, etc.,

etc., Of the small number of active members of the

Fianna then with me almost all are deceased or have

emigrated. The only Fianna Officer available is

Mr. Sean O'Shea, c/o. Mr. D. O'Donaghue, West Main

St., Caherciveen, Co. Kerry. Of the few survivors of

the 3rd Brigade Staff for whom I worked Mr. Muiris

O'Cleirigh, Sec. Gaelic League, Tralee, Co. Kerry

is one in a position to certify my membership of and

activities with the Fianna. During 1920-1921 I

was on many occasions engaged in the carrying of

despatches to the Column on Active Service and participated

ins the noting of movements of members of the Crown

Forces.

 

Full Christian Name: PATRICK JAMES CRYAN

(In Block Capitals)

 

Present Address: Garda Siocanna H. Qrs.,

Kilmainham,

Dublin.

 

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 2002 10:25:19 -0800 (PST) From: "Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | This is Spam | Add to Address Book Subject: [Cryan et al.]

Roscommon Herald Articles No. 122 To: CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com

Roscommon Herald Articles No. 122

Thanks to Veronica Cryan for the typing

16th July,1904.

A.BOYLE. T.C.

Mr. John Cryan, T.C. Vice Regal Bar, Boyle, Appealed against the decision of the court below dismissing a claim for 10 for the malicious killing of a ram, applicant's property at Langnamuddagh near Boyle.

Mr. P.G.P. MacDermot ---That case has been withdrawn.

Lord Chief Baron --- Do you want costs?

Mr. P.C.P. MacDermot --- No costs, my lord.

Lord Chief Baron --- You want an order and costs?

Mr. P.C.P. MacDermot---- Affirmed no to costs.

The Lord Chief Baron affirmed the damage and allow no costs.

 

 

Thu, 12 Dec 2002 10:26:40 -0800 (PST) From: "Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | This is Spam | Add to Address Book Subject: [Cryan et al.] Roscommon Herald Articles No. 123 To: CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com

Roscommon Herald Articles No. 123

Thanks to Veronica Cryan for the typing

28th January, 1904.

 

FRIDAY.

 

 

BIG CARROWREAGH MALICIOUS

INJURY CASE.

 

 

Malicious Injury:

 

Pat Cryan, Carrowreagh, near Killucan, sought to

recover 50 compensation for a quantity of hay,

his

property, being maliciously burned on the 26th

September.

 

Mr. M. McKeon, solicitor, appeared for the

applicant,

and Mr. P.O.P. MacDermot for the Carrick

No.2.District Council.

 

Patrick Cryan , in reply to Mr. McKeon deposed he

was

the applicant, and had lands at Carrowreagh. He

farmed about 70 acres of land, and he remembered

the

26th September, the evening before the stack was

burned. This hay he was seeking compensation for

was

away from his home in a field. On the morning of

the

27th at about eight oclock Mrs. Calery came and

told

him about the burning. When he went down the hay

was

burnt in a few feet from top to bottom, and it

was all

ablaze. The Morning was fine and he did his best

to

save it. There was a fence around the hay, barbed

wire

etc., and one portion of that was broken down.

The

act must have been mallicious, and more than one

person must have committed the act, owing to the

extent of the destruction. He was and ther were

fourteen tons of hay consumed and if was worth

3s.6d.

a cwt where it was, and it was also the last wisp

of

hay he ever saved.

 

To Mr. McDermot --- I am afraid I have not

claimed

enough, and in concequence of the burning of this

hay,

I could not sell some of my bullocks.

 

Can you show any malice of any sort against you?

I

dont think so.

 

Had you a word with any of your neighbours ? I

may

have. It shows you I have enemies.

 

Mr. Brennan, the District Councellor, a good

neighbour, who is to give eveidence ? He is a

fince

neighbour to come up and go against me.

 

As District Councellor, should he let you get a

false

claim? ---- I have no false claim.

 

A District Councellor should let you get 50 for

the

hay that we say that went on fire itself.

 

Cryan said he let matter go for too long as a

mare

that was worth 50, a few years ago

had her knee cut clean through, and about three

years

ago four men came to the door and said they would

burn

the house under him. Then they drove out three of

his

horses and cut the knee out of one of them.

 

Mr. Watson , V.H. could bear him out in his

statement.

 

Mr. MacDermot --- Have you him here ----No

 

Serjeant MacElroy deposed he heard of the

burning

about two o'clock in the evening of the 27th ,

and on

examining of the scene of the occurence he saw a

hanged cock of the saved hay?

Judging from the appearance of the hay he

thought

there would be about ten tons originally in the

cock

of which there were eight tons destroyed and two

saved. The hay smelled very strongly of smoke.

 

To his Lordship. I am a judge of hay and it

appeared

to be [...]

 

By Mr. Mckeon , I cannot say if the hay went on

fire

itself.

 

To Mr. McDermot, I cannot say if the fence was

broken

down by the people trying to save the hay. Cryan

is a

popular man in the district.

 

Owen Travers, in reply to Mr. Mckeon deposed to

endevouring to save his hay.

There should be at least ten tons of hay in the

cock.

 

To Mr. MacDermot ----- I dont say what was the

quality

of the hay.

 

Mr. James Brennan Q.C. deposed that he and Cryan

were

good neighbours and there was not the slightest

ill

feeling against him in the locallity. He did not

hear

of any of the outrages Cryan complained of , but

he

knew of a foal of his was killed once by

lightening .

Witness and the neighbours helped to put out the

fire.

Altogether there would be about seven and [sic]

eight tons of hay in the cock. The hay was of bad

quality.

 

To Mr. McKeon----I saw a good deal later hay

bought

at the Carrick market for 16d a cwt.

 

It is not because when there is a glut of it in

the

market they sell it at any price before they

bring it

home ? No.

 

Mr. McDermot said there was no evidence to show

that

the act was malicious and the ratepayers were not

an

Insurance Company, and compelled to pay for every

accident that orrured .

 

Mr. McKeon submitted that the act was wanton, and

the

lads were clear on that point and pointed to

malice .

No-one could come to that conclusion on the

evidence,

that the burning was a result of an accident.

 

His Lordship said his mind was not altogether

free

from doubt on the matter. As a juror, he came to

the

opinion that the hay must have been deliberately

and

maliciously set on fire. He agreed that what

Mr.Brennan said, that the hay could not have gone

on

fire, except struck by lightening. Mr. Brennan

had

only done his duty to the ratepayers in coming

forward and giving his evidence, and he had given

the

court much assistance. He would allow 15

compensation, to be levied off the Carrick on

Shannon

No.3.Rural District, and allow costs and

expenses.

 

1