January 25, 2002

COHEN / CRYAN URGE NJ JOIN CLASS-ACTION SUIT
AGAINST
ENRON; CITE $60 MILLION PENSION FUND LOSS

Citing a nearly $60 million loss in the
state-administered pension systems as a result of
Enron's financial collapse, Assembly Deputy
Majority
Leader Neil M. Cohen and Assemblyman Joseph Cryan
today urged state Attorney General David Samson
to
authorize New Jersey's inclusion with other
states
mounting a civil class-action lawsuit against the
bankrupt energy company and its financial
advisors.

In a letter sent to Samson this morning, the
Assemblymen said the state has a responsibility
to
protect the interests of the enrollees in the
state's
public employee pension funds.

"As public officials, we have a responsibility to
protect the long-term viability of the state's
pension
funds," Cohen and Cryan wrote. "Today there is
one
Enron bankruptcy. Tomorrow, there could be dozens
of
such cases -- especially if we fail to undertake
efforts aimed at fostering responsible corporate
conduct."

--30--

 

Date: Sat, 6 Apr 2002 11:51:50 -0800 (PST)
From: "Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | Block Address | Add to Address Book
Subject: [Cryan et al.] Twin Towers and a Cryan!
To: CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com
http://abcnews.go.com/sections/scitech/DailyNews/WTC_towers_structure010911.html

Final Collapse
Experts: Twin Towers Were Designed to Withstand
High
Impact

By Amanda Onion

 

 

Sept. 11 - They survived powerful hurricane
gusts,
even a bomb explosion, but this morning's two
intentional plane crashes reduced the twin towers
of
the World Trade Center to rubble.


The 110-story towers, the tallest buildings in
the
city and the fifth and sixth tallest in the
world,
collapsed in billows of debris following two
plane
crashes to their sides.
By early evening, another building in the World
Trade
Center system, a 47-story, 570-foot tall building
known as Seven World Trade Center, also collapsed
after fires had raged all day in its foundation.
The
evacuated building was damaged when the tower
above it
collapsed earlier.

Despite initial damage from the crashes, the two
twintowers remained standing for just over an hour
this morning and appeared to be a testimony to the
abilities of structural engineering.

But experts say structural damage, caused mostly
by fires following the crashes, was evidently severe
enough to overburden the lower sections of the
towers and eventually cause both towers to topple.

 

"The World Trade Center was designed as a very
large tube with steel columns on the perimeter of the
building," said John Cryan, president of Severud
Associates, a structural engineering firm that
provides consulting to skyscraper architects.
"What must have happened is the top part of the
buildings probably collapsed and that put too much weight
on the lower halves and that had a domino effect on the
entire towers."

Built Like a Steel Tube

The World Trade Center hosts an estimated 50,000
employees and receives an average of 1.8 million
visitors annually.

Part of the severity of the damage, Cryan
believes, was the place of impact by the planes. The lower
thecrashes, the greater the damage to the towers'
overallintegrity. The first tower to crumble, the
southerntower, was the one that had received the lowest
strikeby an oncoming aircraft.

Rich Behr, a professor of architectural
engineering atPennsylvania State University, further points out
thatthe approximate one-hour delay in the towers'
collapses suggest the main damage was likely
caused,
not by the plane strikes, themselves, but by
fires that burned inside the buildings for more than an
hourfollowing the crashes. These fires, fueled by the
aircrafts' fuel tanks, likely caused the steel
beamsto melt and lose their stiffness.

"It was the post impact fire that was the major
culprit," said Behr. "After the impact, there was
nosign of stress. [Then], after an hour of flame
weakened steel and [led to the] collapse."

Built by the Port Authority of New York and New
Jerseyin 1973, the World Trade Center towers were the
bestexamples of tube buildings of their time. Tube
buildings are reinforced by closely spaced
columns andbeams in their outer walls, forming a steel tube.
Aseries of glass windows fill in the space between
thebeams. And an internal core beam adds to the
stabilityof tube structures.

To ensure the towers rested on solid bedrock and
notthe six acres of landfill that existed at the
site ofthe towers, workers dug through more than 70 feet
below ground before beginning construction of the
twintowers in the early 1970s.

Engineers at Leslie E. Robertson, an engineering
foundation based in New York City, designed the
building's structure. Employees at this
organization were not immediately available for comment.

Cryan explains that skyscrapers like the World
Trade Center
are designed to take less localized
impacts on a daily basis. The steel beam-lined buildings
rely on their tube network of beams to sustain hurricanes
and seismic events. On Feb. 26, 1993, one of the
towers even survived a bomb explosion at its base. The
explosion created a 22-foot-wide, five-story-deep
crater in the tower.

But today's impacts clearly exceeded the two
towers' standing power.

"I can't imagine the force of these crashes on
the towers," said Cryan. "I can't imagine anybody
wanting to do this."

ABCNEWS' Paul Eng contributed to this report.

Date: Mon, 8 Apr 2002 04:55:39 -0700 (PDT)
From: "Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | Block Address | Add to Address Book
Subject: [Cryan et al.] Andrew Crehan and Ellen Maloney
To: CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com
-- Mercedes Hall 229905 <mhall@esc5.net> wrote:
> Austin Joseph Crehan (in the Baton Rouge
National
> Cemetery, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA) is my
father.
> I know for a fact that his paternal
grandparents
> (Andrew Crehan and Ellen Maloney) and maternal
> grandparents (James Sommerville and Helen
Walsh)
> came from County Limerick. I do not know how
to go
> about searching records in Ireland. Any help
you
> offer will be appreciated.
>
> Mercedes Hall

Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 02:28:45 -0700 (PDT)
From: "Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | Block Address | Add to Address Book
Subject: Fwd: Re: [Cryan et al.] Andrew Crehan and Ellen Maloney
To: CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com

From: Carole C Wagner <cwagner5@juno.com>
Content-Length: 494

Hi, please pass on to Mercedes that I have Civil
War pension papers of an
Andrew Crehan married to an Ellen somebody. They
lived in Pittsburgh,
Pa.
Ask her to reach me at CCWagner5@aol.
That is two Cs where my Juno address has only one
C.
Thanks
Carole Wagner

Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 06:28:20 -0700 (PDT)
From: "Colin Crehan" <colin_crehan@yahoo.com> | Block Address | Add to Address Book
Subject: Re: Fwd: Re: [Cryan et al.] Andrew Crehan and Ellen Maloney
To: "Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com>
Pittsburgh Crehans,
Regarding that last note, I have a friend, who has a sister-in-law married to a Crehan (or maybe a Creehan) in Pittsburgh. If this is an important link for somebody, let me know, and I will seek out an e-mail address.
- Colin Crehan

Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 12:24:36 -0700 (PDT)
From: "Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | Block Address | Add to Address Book
Subject: [Cryan et al.] Roscommon Herald Articles No. 96
To: CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com
cryan-l@rootsweb.com
Roscommon Herald Articles No. 96
Thanks to Veronica Cryan for the typing
2 May 1903
Estreating Recognicances.
District Inspector Madden, charged Patrick Cryan
and
his sureties, Francis Reynolds and John Mahon,
for
that the said Cryan failed to appear when called
upon
according to the terms of the bail bonds signed
by
defendants.

In the absence of Mr. Madden, Head Constable
Lehane
conducted the case.
Mr.Corscadden, who defended, said the Head
Constable
had no use in proving the case, as the case was
proved
in court on a former occasion, when he
(Mr.Corscadden)
was present. He appeared on behalf of Frs.
Reynolds,
and he would ask the magistrates to let him off
as
light as possible, as they have perfect power to
do.
The worst thing is that a man like Mr. Reynolds -
a
most respectable man in Mohill - should be
accountable
for this man. Mr.Reynolds stood up for this man
Cryan,
and expected he would behave himself. It is very
unfortunate that the man did not keep up to those
expectations. Cryan himself is away. If Cryan
were
here he would understand their worships fining
him
very heavily. It is very hard lines that the two
sureties should have to suffer this man, who
happens
to have left the country.
Chairman - How much is bail ?
Mr. Coleman, C.P.S. - 10.
The magistrates retired, and after an absence of
about
ten minutes returned.
The chairman said the magistrates had considered
the
case, and have decided on fining each of the
defendants 5s. and Cryan 10s.

Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 12:25:52 -0700 (PDT)
From: "Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | Block Address | Add to Address Book
Subject: [Cryan et al.] Roscommon Herald Articles No. 97
To: CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com
cryan-l@rootsweb.com
Roscommon Herald Articles No. 97
Thanks to Veronica Cryan for the typing

May 16, 1903.

O B I T U A R Y.

 

DEATH AND FUNERAL OF MR. MICHL CRYAN,
CAR[R]OWREAGH, CARRICK -ON - SHANNON.

 

Seldom has a death occurred in this part of the
country which has excited such feelings of deep
sorrow
and widespread regret as that of Mr. Michael
Cryan.
The regret was not only felt by his friends and
relatives, but by a very wide circle of
acquaintances.
The deceased young gentleman, who was most
deservedly
popular, and had only attained the age of 26
years,
contracted a slight cold whilst attending the
Boyle
March fair, which gradually grew more serious,
despite
the fact that the best medical aid was called
into
requisition, as well as the untiring and tender
care
of loving parents and fond brothers and sisters.
But
all proved futile; God chose him as one of those
pure,
noble, and beautiful, for a higher calling. Death
that
cruel hand, claimed him on Thursday morning, the
7th
inst., and fortified by the rites to the holy
church,
he peacefully breathed his last, surrounded by a
grief
stricken family. His kind, gentlemanly,
unassuming
character, combined with that purity and
nobleness of
heart, endeared him to all classes, and will
remain in
the hearts of everyone who had the pleasure of
knowing
him, as was exemplified by the expressions of
deep
sorrow and regret elicited by his death. He was
the
youngest son of Mr. John Cryan, Carrowreagh, who
is
well known and highly respected in Roscommon and
adjoining counties. The funeral, which took place
on
Saturday evening to the family burial ground in
Killumod, was the largest seen in the district
for
years, and was a fitting index of the respect and
esteem in which deceased was held. The coffin
which
was of richly-polished oak, and handsomely
mounted,
was literally covered with beautiful wreaths. It
bore
the inscription: "Michael Cryan, died the 7th May
1903-aged 26 years - R.I.P."

The chief mourners were - Messrs Martin, Patrick
and
Peter Cryan (brothers) Miss N.Cryan, Miss
K.Cryan,
Mrs.J.J.Nolan, Mrs.P.Morris, Mrs. M.Connellan,
Mrs.M.
Connellan, Mrs.L. Commons, Mrs. G. O'Connor
(sisters)
Mr. J.J.Nolan, Mr. M.Connellan, Mr. P.Morris, Mr.
G.Commons (brothers-in-law) Mr. F.Morris,
Mr.G.Morris,
Mr.N.Morris, Mr. E.O'Connor, Mr.J. O'Connor,
Master
J.Cryan (nephews) Mr. Luke Cryan, Mr. Martin
Carney,
Mr. Peter Carney, Mr. John Carney (uncles) Mr. J.
Cryan, Boyle, Mr. P.J. Carney, Mr. J.J. Carney,
Mr. M.
Carney, Elphin, Mr. P.Cryan, Bridgetown, Mr.
P.Kielty,
Mr. F. Kielty, Flagford, Mr. P. Cryan,
Carrowreagh,
Mr. P. Carney, Mr. J. Carney, Portobello; Mr. M.
Carney, Mr. E. Carney, Mr.J. Carney, Creevolan,
Mr. M.
Moran, Mr.J. Carney, Corballa, Mr. P.O'Farrell,
Leitrim, Mr. G. O'Reilly, Mr. E. O'Reilly,
Longford.
Mr. E.Carney, Strokestown; Mr. E.Stapleton, Hill
Street
. Mr. E.Bannon, Mr. J. Bannon, Clonfad; Mr.
J.
O'Beirne, Cartron; Mr.B.Duignan, Dromod; Mr.
M.Connolly, Mr. R.Connolly, Strokestown -
(cousins).

The following sent wreaths - "With undying love
and
remembrance for our darling Michael," from his
broken-hearted parents, brothers and sisters;
"With
deep sorrow for our darling brother Michael,"
from Mr.
& Mrs. Connellan Elphin; "With deep sorrow and
regret
for our dearest brother Michael," from Mr. & Mrs.
Moran, Doneraile; "In loving remembrance of our
darling brother." From Mr. & Mrs. Commons,
Breedogue;
"In fond and loving remembrance of dearest
Michael."
from S.J. Cryan, Boyle; "To our dear uncle
Michael."
from May, Dolly, Josie and Walter Nolan; "In
loving
remembrance of dearest Uncle from Baby and Frank
Morris; "In fond remembrance of our dear uncle."
from
Michael and Tom O'Connor; To our loving and fond
uncle, Michael." from his sorrowing little nieces
and
nephews, May, Susie, Nora, Jack and Patrick
Cryan.

Amongst those at the funeral were - Rev. Father
O'Brien, P.P., Croghan; Rev. Father M'Gowan, C.C.
Drumlion; Dr. Delaney, Carrick-on-Shannon;
Dr.Threlfall; do.; Mr. J. Barrett, J.P.; Mr.
E.McDermott, do; Mr. P. Flynn, J.P. do.; Mr.
D.Pettit,
do.; Mr. J.J. Rodden,do.: Mr.P.Devany, do.: Mr.
P.
O'Dowd, do.; Mr. J.. Nabola, do.; Mr. K. Feely,
do.;
Mr. J.Murray. do.; Mr. J.J.Connellan, do.; Mr.
J.Cryan, Boyle; Mr. Bertie O'Byrne, Lisadurn
House;
Mr. G.O'Reilly, Longford; Mr. P. Rodgers,
Aughamore
House; Mr. J. Lavin, Elphin; Mr. E. McDermott,
do.;
Mr. J. Dockery, do.; Mr. A. Kelly, C.P.S.;do.;
Mr. J.
Sharkey, do.; Mr. P. O'Dowd, do.; Mr. J. Scott,
do.;
Mr. P.McDermott, Oanbo; Mr. A. Collins, do.; Mr.
P.
Collins, do.; Mr. F. Collins, do.; Mr.E. Commons,
Breedogue; Mr. N. Neary, do.; Mr. J. Neary, do.;
Mr.
P. Cryan, Carrowreagh; Mr. M. Fox. do.; Mr. E.
O'Connor, Larchgrove; Messrs. P. and E. M'Kerman,
do.;
Mr. J. McDermott. Soulmount; Mr. P. O'Dowd.
Clonfad;
Mr. P. Morris, do.; Mr. F. Kielty, do.; Mr.
J.O'Dowd;
Bridgecartron; Mr. H. Kilgannon, Martry; Mr. P.
Kellegher. Co, C., Cartron; Mr. C.Kellegher, do.;
Mr.
Mark McDermott, Machodille; Mr. J. Boyd, Cashel;
Mr.
G. Boyd, do.; Mr. M. Dowd, D.C. Ballyvilla; Mr.
J.
Boyd, do.; Mr. A. Collins, do.; Mr. J. Dowd,
Knockroe;
Mr. D. Boyd, Knockroe; Mr. D. Boyd, Springfield,
Mr.
C. Kellegher, do.; Messrs. G. and M. Devany,
Killucan;
Messrs. F. and G. Hayden, Fortland; Messrs G. M.
and
P. Goldrick, Drumlion; Messrs. M. and G. Feely,
do.;
Messrs. P.J. and M. McDermott, do.; Mr. P. Moran,
do.;
Mr. F. Haydon, do.; Mr. J. McGreevy, do.; Mr. E.
Padden. D.C. do.; Mr. C. Horan, do.; Messrs. J.G.
and
M. Moran, do.; Messrs. G. and M. Dowd, do.; Mr.
J.
M'Greevy. Boher; Mr. G. Dowd, do.; etc., etc.,
Rev.
Father O'Brien, assisted by Rev. Father M'Gowan,
officiated at the graveside. May his soul rest in
peace.

 

Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 12:27:17 -0700 (PDT)
From: "Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | Block Address | Add to Address Book
Subject: [Cryan et al.] Roscommon Herald Articles No. 98
To: CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com
cryan-l@rootsweb.com
Roscommon Herald Articles No. 98
Thanks to Veronica Cryan for the typing

29 August 1903

BOYLE PETTY SESSIONS.

REMINISCENCES OF CARRICK REGATTA.

ROW STARTS IN CARRICK AND WINDS UP IN BOYLE.

TWO YOUNG MEN BOUND TO THE PEACE.

A HINT TO LEAVE SLIGO ROAD.

INTERESTING LICENSING PROSECUTION.

R.M. AND SOLICITOR ON THE SUNDAY CLOSING ACT.

SOME LIVELY EXCHANGES.

These petty sessions were held on Wednesday,
before
Mr.W. Jones. R.M. (presiding) and Major J.F.
Murphy,
J.P.,

WANDERING ANIMALS;

Constable Cannon summoned Mr. A. Poynton for
allowing
two cows and a horse to wander on a public road
at
Breandrum and he was fined 1s. and costs.

ASSAULT.
District Inspector T.L. McClelland charged two
respectable young fellows named Thomas Higgins,
who
lives at Carramore, and Wm. Higgins who resides
at
Erris, with assaulting Henry Baker, Junior and
Michael
Duffy, at Warren, on the night of the 3rd August.
There were cross-cases by the two defendants in
the
Crown case against Baker and Duffy for assault.
Mr. P. C.P. MacDermot appeared for Thomas and
William
Higgins and Mr. W.J. Higgins was for Baker in the
case
against him for alleged assault.
Head Constable Gallagher was first examined, and
deposed that Baker and Duffy declined to
prosecute.
Mr. McClelland - Both declined to prosecute and
we
then took up the case.
Mr. MacDermot asked that Duffy be put out of
court
while Baker was being
examined.
Mr. McClelland - Well, put them all out so.
Mr. MacDermot - There are no witnesses for this
side
except the defendants, and they are entitled to
be
here. They have a cross-case, and I would ask you
to
hear it before giving your decision.
The witnesses were then ordered out of court.
Henry Baker (junior) deposed that on the 3rd of
August, at about 9 o'clock at night he was
sitting in
Mr. Webb's cart going home. At Warren Tom Higgins
and
William Higgins came over from the roadside and
pulled
him out of the cart, knocked him down and kicked
him.
He had to get two stitches in his head.
Mr. Jones - Why did they assault you ? - Tom
Higgins
left his own side of the road to beat me.
Had you any dispute before ? They followed me
through
the town that evening.
For what ? - I could not say.
Oh, you can say? - I cannot tell you.
Mr. McClelland - What was the cause of the row?
- I
cannot say.
Mr. Jones - People don't do that without some
motive.
Why should they follow you more than anyone else?
-
Tom struck me in the town before that.
Mr. Jones - You ought to be well able for that
fellow
anyway.
Baker - He came across the road and young Duffy
ran
away.
Mr. Jones - What did he strike you with ? - He
knocked
me down with a box, and then he kicked me.
Cross-examined by Mr. MacDermot - your father is
a
herd on the Plains ? - Yes.
Mr. Jones - are the defendants not brothers?
Mr. MacDonald - No sir (To Baker) - You are
Herds, and
live near each other? - Yes.
Unfortunately, for yourself you have been
convicted
here several times ? I have not been up here
these
couple of years.
How many convictions were against you up to that
time?
- only one for being drunk.
Head Constable Gallagher - I am four years here,
and
in justice to Baker it is only fair to say he has
only
been up once, and that was for obstruction on the
footpath.
Mr.MacDermot - Were you ever up for assault?
Baker - No sir.
At the time you were summoned for obstructing the
thoroughfare was William Higgins standing on the
footpath with you ? - Yes
Do you know that the Head Constable warned him
not to
keep your company? - I know nothing about it.
Since that time this boy is not as friendly with
you
as he used to be ? - No.
You don't like that I suppose?
Mr. Jones - Did the Head Constable warn him?
Baker - not that I know.
Mr. MacDermott - I will prove it. The Head
Constable
does not dispute it.
Head Constable Gallagher - I may have cautioned
him
against standing on the footpath, but with regard
to
keeping Baker's company that did not occur. Mr.
MacDermot - Since that time you and Higgins are
not
friendly ? - No.
On this day you were all at Carrick Regatta ? -
We
were.
Were you under the influence of drink? - I had
some
taken.
You admit you were not friendly with both of them
for
some time? - Yes.
Did you meet them on their way to the Railway
Station
at Carrick that night? - They were before me on
the
road.
Did you assault any of them on the way to Carrick
Station ? - No.
Did you come up with them? - I overtook them.
What did you say to them ? - I said nothing to
them.
Were you pretty drunk? - I was, but I was able to
take
care of myself
Did you meet them at Mr. Cryan's corner when you
came
to this town ? - Yes. Tom Higgins followed me
into Mr.
Cryan's.
What occurred in Mr. Cryan's? - He caught hold of
me
and pulled my tie off.
Did you say anything to him? - No, sir.
They went out the road before you ? - They did.
And you went after them ? - Yes.
Didn't you turn up to go home at Mr. Dickie's? -
Yes.
Where about did this occur? Weren't they sitting
on
the wall there, and do you swear they attacked
you on
the roadside without any reason what ever? - They
did,
and stopped Mr. Webb's jennet on the road.
Michael Duffy deposed he is in the employment of
Mr.
Webb, and on the night of the 3rd he went to the
Railway Station for luggage. He went down to Mr.
Cryan's and got some things. Willie Higgins and
Tom
came up the street and Tom said that is "Fealy's
jennet".
Mr. Jones - Who is Feely? - He is a Herd for Mr.
Webb.
They walked out the road and when I got the
things out
of Mr. Cryan's I was going home, and the opposite
Mr.
Dickie's - Mr. McClelland - Where did you come
across
Baker? - At Mr. Cryan's.
And did you give him a seat on the cart? - I did.
When
we got as far as Mr.Dickie's Tom Higgins ran out
and
caught me by the two arms. I gave a kick to the
Jennet
and she started to gallop. Tom caught the rains,
and
tried to hold me in the reins. He turned the
jennet
for Boyle, and I jumped off the cart, and went
five or
six yards above them off the road. Henry Baker
was
leaping off the cart when Tom Higgins gave him a
shove
and knocked him down. Willie ran back from the
wall
and gave him a kick on head.
Mr. McClelland - was he cut? - He was sir.
Mr. Jones what did you do ? - I did nothing, but
went
eight or nine yards above them and stood there.
What did they do then? - They kicked Baker for
about
five minutes. Henry Baker said "Hold on, boys,
don't
kick." They were kicking him, and he got out of
it.
They came up a piece of the road to where we were
standing, and ran down the hill and up Mr.
Dickie's
lane. I went down for the jennet and cart and
went
home.
Cross-examined by Mr. MacDermot -- did you see
the two
of them kick him? yes.
What was the commencement of this ? - I don't
know.
Was Baker drunk? - He was not too drunk. Had you
any
drink taken? - No I don't drink at all.
Mr. Jones - Did you see any row going on in Mr.
Cryan's ? - No sir.
Head Constable Gallagher - Whatever occurred in
Cryan's, I inquired about it, and it did not last
a
minute.
Mr.MacDermot - Did Baker try or do anything to
them?
Duffy - Nothing that I know of. He did nothing to
them
while I was on the cart with them.
Do you mean to say he said or did nothing to
them? -
Not a word sir.
Mrs. Mary Clancy, Erris, deposed that was the
night of
the 3rd she was returning home at about nine
o'clock
and when she came past Mr. Dickie's she saw
William
and Tom Higgins sitting on the wall. She was up
the
road when Henry Baker overtook her: he was then
all
blood.
Mr.McClelland - Did you hear anything? - I heard
noise
before Henry Baker overtook me.
Mr. Jones - Did you look back when you heard the
noise? - I did, and could see nothing only Henry
Baker
covered with blood.
Did you see anyone follow him? - I saw these two
boys.
Where was the other hero? - Duffy was also there.
The
two were running away, and I brought Baker to my
house, and told him to get his head dressed.
About ten
o'clock Tom Higgins came to my house shouting for
Baker to come out, and he would twist the head
off
him.
Mr. Jones - Was William with him? - He was, but
said
nothing.
Cross-examined by Mr. McDermot - Tom Higgins's
people
and you are not on good terms - they had you up
for
trespass? We are not on good terms. They never
had me
up for trespass, but they had my brother.

THE CROSS-CASES.

The cross-cases were next gone into.
Thomas Higgins deposed he was at Carrick Regatta
on
that day. When Willie Higgins and he were going
to the
Railway Station from Carrick, Baker struck Willie
Higgins and knocked him down. He struck him
(Thomas)
coming from Boyle Station and left a mark on him.
They
went into Mr.Cryan's public house and were having
a
drink when Baker struck him again. The shop
assistant
put Baker out. They went out the road, and Baker
----
Mr. Jones - have you any independent witness to
prove
Baker struck you coming from the train? - No; Mr.
Cryan's shop-boy put us out.
Mr. MacDermot - Of course Baker is Mr. Cryan's
herd,
and the shop assistant would not like to put him
out.
Thomas Higgins, continuing, said Baker came after
them
shouting, and when getting off the cart fell.
When he
got up he struck William Higgins, and they got in
holds and fell. He never touched Baker or the
jennet
or cart.
Mr. MacDermot - What attracted your attention
when the
cart came up? - He came up shouting, and said he
did
not care for any Higgins that ever walked the
road. He
got off the cart, fell and struck Willie Higgins.
Duffy ran away and started to throw stones at us.
He
never struck or kicked Baker, and did not see
Willie
Higgins strike him.
Mr. MacDermot - You and Baker are not on friendly
terms? - I was not in his company for twelve
months.
It was on account of William Higgins not being
great
with him that I did not mix with him.
Cross-examined by Mr. Robinson - Were you very
drunk?
- I was not drunk at all.
Mrs. Clancy, re-called by Mr. Jones, said Baker
was
not shouting on the cart.
Thomas Higgins on further cross-examination by
Mr.
Robinson, said he had six or seven bottles of
stout in
Carrick.
Mr. Robinson - Had you no whiskey? - No.
Had the other Higgins any? - It was all porter he
had.
What was the cause of the row at Carrick? - I
can't
say.
Was there anyone with Baker to the station - A
boy
names Lee was along with him.
Was Lee on the lee-side of Baker when you alleged
he
assaulted him Higgins? (Laughter) Why isn't Lee
here?
--I don't know.
Mr. Jones asked the Head Constable to send down
to Mr.
Cryan's for the assistant. Head Constable
Gallagher -
I was in with the assistant, and he said Baker
was in
the shop first, and, the whole thing didn't last
a
minute.
The assistant was sent for.
Mr. Robinson - Will you swear the scarf was not
torn
off his neck ?
Thomas Higgins - I didn't see the scarf torn off
his
neck.
You were put out ? - We were.
Why were you put out ? - Because Baker was rowing
with
us.
Do you expect the bench to believe you when you
give-that answer. What were you put out of the
shop
for ? - Well, I suppose for rowing.
Were you put out because you were very drunk? -
No; I
was not drunk.
What made you sit on the side of the road ? - We
did
not sit on the side of the road at all: we were
walking.
So what young Duffy and what that respectable
woman
swears is untrue ? - Yes.
What stopped the cart ? Some of themselves
stopped the
cart.
What did Duffy do to you ? - He threw stones at
me.
Mr. William Mullarkey, assistant in Mr. Cryan's
establishment, was then called.
Mr. Jones - Without anybody asking you a question
or
suggesting anything, tell us what happened in the
shop.
Mr. Mullarkey - Baker came in after coming from
the
station, and Tom Higgins came in after him and
struck
him. They then struck each other a few times, and
I
separated them and put out these chaps, and Baker
stopped inside, so I did not see any more.
Mr. Jones - Did you see Baker's tie pulled off. ?
- I
did not, sir.
Did you put out this man (Thomas Higgins) or did
he go
out himself ? - I got the boy out.
Was the other Higgins with him ? - He was.
Did he do anything ? - No, sir.
Was Thomas Higgins drunk or sober ? - I could not
say
he was drunk.
Was Baker sober ? - He was about half drunk.
Mr. MacDermot - Did you give them any drink ? -
No,
sir.
You would not say either of these boys was drunk
? -
No.
Did you remark any signs of drink ? - Not very
remarkable.
Could you say who hit first ? - Higgins did.
What occurred before he hit him ? - There was no
argument previously.
Are you able to say who was in first? -
Baker was not long in before Higgins. I should
say
about five or ten minutes.
You were busy, of course, in the shop ? -
Yes, I was.
When was your attention attracted first to
Higgins ? -
Simply at the start of the row.
What was the first thing said or done ? - I could
not
exactly say.
Can you honestly say that Higgins hit Baker first
? -
- Yes.
Mr. Jones - How long after you got this boy out
did
Baker remain in the shop? - Only about five or
ten
minutes. I told him to be going home.
The case of William Higgins against Baker and
Duffy
was next taken up.
William Higgins said he was with Thomas Higgins
at the
Regatta, and when they were going to the station
at
Carrick, Baker came up to them and asked them if
any
of them wanted a fight. He said "No" and Baker
struck
him and knocked him down. He got up and walked to
the
Railway Station. That night when they got out of
the
train at Boyle, Baker followed them and struck
Tom
Higgins under the left eye, and raised a lump on
it.
When they came down the street they went into Mr.
Cryan's, and Baker followed them in and struck
Tom
Higgins again. Both had holds and Mr. Cryan's boy
got
between them and told them to out. They went out.
Mr. MacDermot - What part of the shop did you go
into
? - The Bar.
Was Baker there when you went in ? - I could not
say.
They are in two divisions in the Bar ? - There
are.
And which division were you in ? - The lower
part. We
were going home, and Baker began shouting for any
Higgins on the road and when he got up to us he
jumped
off the cart and fell. When I got up he made a
rush at
me and knocked down. He started With Tom Higgins,
and
afterwards they both got in holds and fell. Young
Duffy threw stones at them and he and Tom Higgins
ran
behind Mr.Diukie's [sic] and they had to stop
there
for half an hour.
Cross-examined by Mr. Robinson - when did you and
Mr.
Higgins take out a cross'summons? - On Friday
night.
And when were you served with the summons by the
Crown? - On Wednesday.
Mr. MacDermot - it occurred on the 3rd August,
and I
find that the summons was not issued until the
18th
August. Of course there would be nothing about
this
only that the Crown took it up.
Mr.McClelland - We gave them the opportunity of
prosecuting.
Mr. MacDermot - Oh, I am not complaining of your
delay
at all.
Mr. Robinson - Did you not intend to summon Baker
until you got the Crown summons?
William Higgins - No, sir.
Major Murphy - That is natural.
Mr. Robinson - Had you much drink at Carrick ?
William Higgins - About, six or seven bottles of
stout.
Mr. Mr. Jones (to the Head Constable) - Did you
see
Baker ?
Head Constable Gallagher - He had an ugly cut on
his
head, and I told him to get it dressed that
night. He
got two stitches in it the next day.
Mr. MacDermot said of course it was very hard to
know
the truth in the case. but they could not miss
the
point that Baker would not prosecute himself.
which
went to show that he must have thought he was
culpable
in some way.
Mr. Jones - He might have a reason to fear them.
Mr. MacDermot - is it that big fellow?
He has a brother, too, as big as himself.
Mr. Jones - Have these boys ever been prosecuted
before?
Mr. Gillespie, C.P.S. said they were very
respectable
boys.
Mr. Jones - Has the man quite recovered?
Head Constable Gallagher - Oh, yes. He was moving
about the whole time, but not
working for a couple of days.
Mr. Jones - How long was he off work?
Baker - I was a week, Sir.
Mr. Jones said it was simply their character that
saved the two boys, Thomas and William Higgins,
from
going to jail, as it was essentially a case for
sending to jail where fellows lay in ambush and
waylaid-a-man like that. It, however was a
continuous
dispute, and there was drink in question. Owing
to
their respectability, he did not like sending
young
fellows to jail, but they would fine Thomas l,
and
fine the other 10s, and put both under a rule of
bail
for twelve months, themselves in 10, and two
sureties
of 5 each. If any of them came before him for
assault
or waylaying he would send them to jail. He must
say
he was very sorry to hear such evidence given in
a
court. There was direct perjury and it was very
easy
to see who were the perjurers.

 

 

Date: Thu, 2 May 2002 12:28:12 -0700 (PDT)
From: "Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | Block Address | Add to Address Book
Subject: [Cryan et al.] Roscommon Herald Articles No. 99
To: CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com
cryan-l@rootsweb.com
Roscommon Herald Articles No. 99
Thanks to Veronica Cryan for the typing

6 June 1903
ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN.

Mr. John Cryan was unanimously moved to the
temporary
chair.
Chairman - You are all aware of the reason for
which
this meeting has been summoned.
Your first business is to elect a chairman for
the
ensuing year.
Mr. Boylan - I have much pleasure in proposing
Mr.
Cryan for the position of chairman.
Mr. Shiel seconded the proposition. Mr. Cryan was
an
excellent chairman, and had attended their
meetings
when required.
Mr. Casey - It should be unanimous, as he is the
right
man in the right place.
There was no other candidate proposed, and Mr.
Cryan
returned thanks for the members electing him to
the
position. He did not intend to go forward, but
circumstances altered cases.
Mr. Mullany said Mr. Cryan should be an addition
to
their body, as he had such experience at the
County
Council.

Date: Fri, 3 May 2002 03:07:25 -0700 (PDT)
From: "Caoimhghin O Croidheain" <caoimhghin@yahoo.com> | Block Address | Add to Address Book
Subject: [Cryan et al.] Cryan or Crane or Crean
To: CRYAN-L@rootsweb.com
CRANE769@aol.com

 

Caoimhghin

I am now after 25 years lookin in posession of
documentation re: the importation of my great
Grandfather Dominic Cryan or Crane or Crean
depending
on the occasion or the person writing it down,
thanks
to your great website. I was for a long timne
under
the belief that Dominic came out of Mayo but now

 

 

 

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